Defense Attorney

Aaron De Bruin | Criminal Defense

“Because your Future Deserves a Defense”

Greenville Criminal Defense Attorney

Remember: A Criminal Charge is Not a Conviction!

Criminal charges are a serious matter. In many cases, someone charged with a crime may face the possibility of jail. Additionally, a criminal charge may affect you for the rest of your life by limiting your ability to find work. However, it is important to remember a charge is not a conviction! You have the right to fight and defend yourself from criminal prosecution. You have a right to fight the charges against you. An experienced defense attorney can help.

It is important to have a lawyer who understands of sides of the criminal justice system.

Prior to becoming a criminal defense attorney Aaron De Bruin was a prosecutor for the United States Marine Corps. As a JAG Officer, he prosecuted a wide variety of criminal cases. As a former prosecutor Aaron understand both sides of the criminal justice system, and the best ways to help defend you against your criminal charges. He understands how the other side views evidence and operates. Therefore, he knows what to look for when reviewing the evidence and accusations made against you. Don’t wait until the last minute to speak with an attorney. Aaron cares about his client’s future. that is why he offers a free case evaluation.

How a Criminal Defense Attorney Can Help You

An attorney familiar with the criminal justice system can help you during the stressful criminal procedure process. The Criminal Defense section of the De Bruin Law Firm is led by Aaron De Bruin. He you are thinking about hiring an attorney to defend you here are some things you need to think about when deciding which attorney is best for you.

Five Questions You Need to Ask Before Hiring a Criminal Defense Attorney:

Who will handle my case?

How do you know the attorney you hire is the attorney who will represent you during the entire process? I personally guarantee that I will handle every part of your criminal case, you will not be passed of t a junior attorney.

What will a criminal defense attorney do for my case?

Once I have evaluated your case I will provide you an overview of your case. This will describe among other things the criminal law process, how we will work together to navigate the criminal justice system, and what expectation I have for you as a client and what expectations you should have for me as your defense attorney.

What should my attorney do to prepare my case for trial?

I collect not only the evidence that the government is required to supply, but also gather my own evidence for your defense as well. I will talk to witnesses, look for other video from third party sources, and go to the scene of the alleged offense. I believe your case is far to important not to go the extra mile to insure we know all the facts for your case, to provide you the best possible defense.

What do I need to do to help my attorney defend me?

No one cares more about your case than you. While we prepare your case, we also prepare your for trial. The one thing we need most from you is total honesty. Remember, everything you and I talk about is confidential. I am on your side.

For Drug offense cases, we may require you to look into a rehabilitation facility. I have had client’s charged with drug crimes who unfortunately we suffering from serious addiction and needed help, not jail. When I was able to convince those clients to make the difficult decision and enter a rehabilitation facility it helped create a positive situation that made negotiating their case more favorable. Many criminal cases last over a year. If I can help get a client suffering from an addition on the path to recovery while defending them from their criminal drug charges, their future becomes much more optimistic, and often, so does their case. Changing your life prior to trial or before a plea will greatly decrease your changes of going to jail. We are here to help not only with your legal needs, but also to help you in life. We have seen success stories and want you to be one too.

How much does a criminal defense attorney cost?

Your attorney’s fees will be based on multiple things including but not limited to, the severity of the crime, the evidence against you, prior convictions, and the amount of jail time your are facing if convicted. For criminal defense services I charge my client’s a flat fee on almost all cases at the start of their case. Therefore, you know how much your case will cost on day one.

I also am aware that  many people are unable to afford to pay thousands of dollars upfront. In order to better serve my clients I offer a payment plan option. If you’d like to see if you qualify for our criminal defense payment plan option please contact us by using our form, or call us directly at (864) 372-2896.


Cases We Defend

Burglary Charges


A conviction for burglary has the potential to follow you for the rest of your life. In South Carolina, there are three (3) separate classifications for burglary: first, second, and third degree burglary. All three are classified as a felony charge. A burglary conviction may affect your employment and any future educational opportunities, and may result in imprisonment.

If you are charged with burglary, a criminal defense attorney can help. The criminal process can be difficult to understand and stressful to handle. Greenville Defense Attorney Aaron De Bruinrepresents and defends clients charged with the crime of burglary. We help our clients understand the judicial process while we defend their rights.


Assault Charges

A conviction of assault could have serious ramifications. Depending on the severity of the offense, a conviction may be either a misdemeanor or a felony. A potential employer who receives a record of your criminal background will see an assault conviction.

Aaron De Bruin represents clients who have been charged with assault-related crimes. When you are facing criminal charges, it can be beneficial to have an attorney represent you in order to best defend your rights.

South Carolina Penalties for Assault & Battery: In South Carolina, assault and battery may be charged either as a felony or misdemeanor, depending on the particular facts of the case. Assaults are categorized between first, second, third degree, or aggravated assault. Aggravated assault is a charge above first degree assault. In South Carolina, if a person is convicted of assault and battery, they could potentially face:

Aggravated Assault: A felony conviction and imprisonment up to 20 years

First Degree Assault: A felony conviction and up to ten years imprisonment

Second Degree Assault: A misdemeanor conviction and a fine up to $2,500, imprisonment up to three years, or both

Third Degree Assault: A misdemeanor conviction and a fine up to $500, imprisonment up to 30 days, or both

If you have been charged with assault or battery, contact Aaron De Bruin to learn more about our assault defense attorney services.

Drug Charges


Drug charges are among the most common charges people face in South Carolina. The type of drug (substance), the amount, and the purpose (trafficking, manufacturing, or possessing) all play a part in how you are charged. These charges may vary from misdemeanors with little to no jail time, to felonies with the possibility of significant jail time. Additionally, South Carolina has some of the strictest penalties for those convicted of a drug-related offense in the country.

Given the consequences facing you if convicted of a drug-related crime, it’s important to defend yourself. Hiring a criminal defense attorney to defend you against a misdemeanor or felony drug charge can be critical to your future success. Aaron De Bruin defends clients charged with drug-related crimes. If you’ve been charged in Greenville, Spartanburg, Anderson, or Pickens county, Aaron offers a free case evaluation to help you better understand some of the options available to you. Hiring an attorney isn’t an easy process, but neither is going through this difficult time in your life without an experienced attorney advocating for your best interests.

Sometimes, clients have made multiple choices that have negatively affected their life and their relationships with those around them. Sometimes, life’s circumstances have made getting away from an environment that isn’t good for them seem next to impossible. Sometimes, our clients just need a second chance and a fresh start. By defending your rights, and advocating on your behalf, the De Bruin Law Firm seeks to give those clients the fresh start, second chance, and professional advocate they need to get through the difficulties associated with being charged with a drug-related crime.

A conviction related to a drug offense can have a serious and detrimental impact on your future. The De Bruin Law Firm represents clients who have been charged with a drug offense and will work diligently to protect your rights during this stressful time that is the criminal process.



At times, a person convicted of a crime will receive probation. Probation is a form of state supervision meant to help people adjust their life in order to stay away from any bad decisions that they have made in the past. However, in life, change isn’t easy, and a probation violation can have serious consequences. A year of probation can quickly turn into a jail sentence with a probation violation. Having an attorney by your side to defend you can help.



Pretrial Intervention is a South Carolina program designed for first-time offenders charged with nonviolent offenses. Its aim is to divert those charged with a crime from committing future offenses and give them another chance.

This program is a one-time only program where its participants perform community service, take prison tours, and attend alcohol education courses. Greenville Criminal Defense Attorney Aaron De Bruin can help those who may be eligible for the program to navigate the court process.

Domestic Violence Charge


Domestic violence charges in South Carolina can include very serious consequences to those charged. The person accused of criminal domestic violence could face stiff financial penalties, could lose the right to carry a firearm, be evicted from his or her apartment, and even be jailed, losing your most important right: your freedom. Given the potentially severe consequences, it is important to learn more about a Greenville criminal domestic violence charge.


Those accused of domestic violence also have rights in South Carolina, including the right to a trial by jury, the right to challenge witnesses, and the right to testify (or not) at trial. It’s crucial to understand that perpetrators of domestic violence do not need to prove their innocence; the law exists to require prosecutors to prove that the defendant is guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

Those arrested and charged with criminal domestic violence in South Carolina should also understand that they are entitled to be represented by a lawyer at every stage of the process. This is a critical right, as it allows defendants to rely on the years of experience of a seasoned criminal defense attorney. Rather than feel alone in a confusing and often scary criminal justice system, a criminal defense attorney understands the process and can effectively advocate on your behalf, standing in your corner when so many others may be in opposition. A skilled South Carolina criminal defense lawyer will step in from the very beginning of the criminal process and ensure that your rights are protected. This is done by thoroughly investigating the facts underlying your charges, challenging the prosecution’s version of events, and exploring possible alternatives to a risky criminal trial, such as a negotiated plea deal.


It isn’t uncommon for domestic disturbances to escalate quickly. What began as a small argument may become increasingly loud and hostile and lead to police involvement and even an arrest. Once tempers cool, those involved may have second thoughts about the seriousness of the event, and may even decide to drop any criminal complaint against the perpetrator. In other cases, a victim of domestic violence may be terrified of going forward with a criminal prosecution, fearing this could spark even worse violence. As a result, the victim may ask to drop charges. So what do prosecutors do?

Some police departments and counties in South Carolina handled the issue by implementing what are known as “no drop” policies. A “no drop” policy refers to the inability of victims of criminal domestic violence to drop charges against the perpetrator.

Though these “no drop” policies used to be far more common, today, police departments and prosecutors are mindful that not every domestic violence case deserves to move forward. Prosecutors can and sometimes do dismiss cases if the facts are such that moving ahead is not in the interest of justice.